EPRS Admin By / November 18, 2021

Why a food summit

Why a food summit

Why a food summit

While there is undeniable evidence that agri-business is a key driver of climate change and biodiversity loss, the reverse is also true: climate variability and extreme shocks are one of the leading causes of severe food crises and rising global hunger. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report waved a red flag for human-driven global warming, stating that without immediate, rapid and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, it would be impossible to limit global warming to close to 1.5°C or even to 2°C. The ‘hidden costs’ of food – indirect, adverse effects of policies on climate change, biodiversity loss and health consequences ¬– are estimated to be twice the current food market value.
Although exacerbated by the pandemic, the profound imbalances and distortions inherent to current global food systems were present well before. Figure 1 illustrates some of the poignant paradoxes of the current production and consumption of food in the world, depicting a global food system that is unsustainable, unhealthy and unfair.


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