By / December 4, 2015

Employment rates of foreign-born population aged 15-64 not in education by educational level, 2012-2013 (Difference with the native-born in percentage points)

Employment rates of foreign-born population aged 15-64 not in education by educational level, 2012-2013 (Difference with the native-born in percentage points)

Employment rates of foreign-born population aged 15-64 not in education by educational level, 2012-2013 (Difference with the native-born in percentage points)

Even if migration is not directly driven by workforce needs, immigrants play an important role in many sectors. According to the OECD, migrants represented 22% of entries into strongly growing occupations in the United States and 15% in Europe. These included, amongst others, occupations in the field of health-care and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). At the same time, immigrants represented about a quarter of entries into the most strongly declining occupations in Europe (24%) and the United States (28%). In Europe, these occupations include craft and related trades workers as well as machine operators and assemblers; in the United States, they concern mostly jobs in production, installation, maintenance and repair. In all these areas, immigrants are filling labour needs by taking up jobs regarded by domestic workers as unattractive or lacking career prospects. Relative to the native-born population, low-educated migrants are better integrated in the labour market than highly educated ones. On the one hand, Member States are complaining about supposedly (too) low-skilled migrants/refugees but evidence shows that those who are eventually granted access to the labour market have to do so often below their skill level.


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