you're reading...
International Relations, PUBLICATIONS

Trump, trade and tariffs [What Think Tanks are thinking]

Written by Marcin Grajewski,

© Stephen Finn / Fotolia

U.S. President Donald Trump has imposed tariffs on steel and aluminium imports, raising fears of a trade war with other countries. He has argued that the levies, of 25 percent on steel and 10 percent on aluminium, are needed to protect U.S. national security. But many analysts and politicians believe that they are actually meant to protect domestic producers and meet Trump’s pre-election promise to return manufacturing jobs to the U.S. The European Union is seeking an exemption from the tariffs, which has already been granted in principle to Canada and Mexico. If this does not happen, the EU could respond in several ways, including by imposing its own tariffs on U.S. products.

This note offers links to a series of recent commentaries and reports from major international think tanks and research institutes in reaction to Trump’s decision. More reports on international trade can be found in a previous edition of ‘What Think Tanks are thinking’ published in June 2017

The Trump tariffs on steel and aluminium: The end of the WTO?
European Centre for International Political Economy, March 2018

Are we steel friends?
Bruegel, March 2018

Trump has shown how dangerous he is to the global trading system
Chatham House, March 2018

U.S. steel and aluminium tariffs: How should the EU respond?
Bruegel, March 2018

How Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs could affect state economies
Brookings Institution, March 2018

Trump’s trade policy turns destructive
Centre for European Policy Studies, March 2018

The risks of U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs
Council on Foreign Relations, March 2018

What we do and don’t know after Trump’s tariff announcement
Peterson Institute for International Economics, March 2018

Trade policy-making under irrationality
Centre for European Policy Studies, March 2018

How imports helped the American steel industry
Brookings Institution, March 2018

A trade war on the poor: How a collapse of the WTO would hurt the worst off
Council on Foreign Relations, March 2018

Tariffs open can of worms Trump won’t be able to get back on
American Enterprise Institute, March 2018

Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs: How WTO retaliation typically works
Peterson Institute for International Economics, March 2018

Trump, China, and steel tariffs: The day the WTO died
Council on Foreign Relations, March 2018

Trade talks episode 29. After Trump’s tariffs: Retaliation, negotiation, and litigation
Peterson Institute for International Economics, March 2018

Shots fired: EU takes aim at peanut butter as Trump targets steel
Atlantic Council, March 2018

Are Trump’s tariffs aimed at the WTO?
Atlantic Council, March 2018

Trump steel tariffs could kill up to 40,000 auto jobs, equal to nearly one-third of steel workforce
Council on Foreign Relations, March 2018

Donald Trump, steel tariffs, and the costs of chaos
Council on Foreign Relations, March 2018

Public comment on Trump administration report on significant trade deficits
Peterson Institute for International Economics, March 2018

Trump’s tariffs will hurt the economy: Congress should reassert its constitutional authority on trade
Heritage Foundation, March 2018

Trump’s tariffs would be a massive, self-Inflicted wound
Heritage Foundation, March 2018

This threat of a trade war is the opposite of “Drain the Swamp”
Cato Institute, March 2018

Trump is serious about tariffs
Hudson Institute, March 2018

Trump’s steel and aluminum tariffs are counterproductive: Here are 5 more things you need to know
Peterson Institute for International Economics, March 2018

Potential fallout of misguided steel and aluminum tariffs
Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, March 2018

Trade remedies for steel and aluminum were long overdue
Economic Policy Institute, March 2018

5 times US tariffs have made matters worse
Foundation for Economic Education, March 2018

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Download the EPRS App

EPRS App on Google Play
EPRS App on App Store
What Europe Does For You
EU Legislation in Progress
Topical Digests
EPRS Podcasts

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,704 other followers

Disclaimer and Copyright statement

The content of all documents (and articles) contained in this blog is the sole responsibility of the author and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily represent the official position of the European Parliament. It is addressed to the Members and staff of the EP for their parliamentary work. Reproduction and translation for non-commercial purposes are authorised, provided the source is acknowledged and the European Parliament is given prior notice and sent a copy.

For a comprehensive description of our cookie and data protection policies, please visit Terms and Conditions page.

Copyright © European Union, 2014-2018. All rights reserved.

%d bloggers like this: