you're reading...
BLOG, What Europe does for you

People fighting wildlife trafficking [What Europe does for you]

With European elections coming up in May 2019, you probably want to know how the European Union impacts your daily life, before you think about voting. In the latest in a series of posts on what Europe does for you, your family, your business and your wellbeing, we look at what Europe does for people fighting wildlife trafficking.

Wildlife trade is one of the most lucrative trades in the world. The legal trade into the EU alone is worth €100 billion annually, while the global illegal wildlife trade (trafficking) is worth between €8 and 20 billion annually. The trade is highly complex and its legal and illegal forms are often connected. Although wildlife trafficking is not a new phenomenon, it has worsened considerably in recent years, driven by demand for medicines, fashion, pets and food, and has now become one of the most profitable criminal activities worldwide. It has devastating effects for biodiversity (for instance where elephants and rhinos are concerned) but also for the rule of law, as it fuels corruption and can help to fund militant groups.

Drinking Elephants in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

©simoneemanphoto / Fotolia

The EU has been engaged in the fight against wildlife trafficking for decades: it supports protected areas and funds biodiversity protection in Africa; it has strict rules to make sure that wildlife products only enter the EU if they are legal and sustainable; and it supports enforcement against wildlife crime at international level. Through development aid, the EU also helps to reduce poverty and inequalities in countries of origin, two of the root causes of wildlife crime.

In 2016, the European Union bolstered its action against wildlife trafficking: it introduced new measures to prevent trafficking (for instance by combatting the ivory trade from and within the EU), step up the fight against criminal activities linked with trafficking, and build a global alliance against wildlife crime.

Further information

Discussion

One thought on “People fighting wildlife trafficking [What Europe does for you]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Download the EPRS App

EPRS App on Google Play
EPRS App on App Store
EU Legislation in Progress
Topical Digests
EPRS Podcasts

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,586 other followers

RSS Link to Members’ Research Service

Disclaimer and Copyright statement

The content of all documents (and articles) contained in this blog is the sole responsibility of the author and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily represent the official position of the European Parliament. It is addressed to the Members and staff of the EP for their parliamentary work. Reproduction and translation for non-commercial purposes are authorised, provided the source is acknowledged and the European Parliament is given prior notice and sent a copy. Copyright © European Union, 2014. All rights reserved

%d bloggers like this: