you're reading...
Institutional and Legal Affairs, PUBLICATIONS

The European Parliament 2009-14 : Five years’ work in figures

This “At a glance” infographic aims to give a succinct picture of some of the activities undertaken by the European Parliament over the most recent term, from July 2009 to date.

The Parliament adopts its positions by voting in plenary session on legislative and budgetary texts, as well as on owninitiative reports and other resolutions. EP committees prepare the ground, with detailed consideration of draft legislation and public hearings on key issues. Oral and written questions can be asked to the other institutions. The Parliament also devotes considerable energy to working with Member States’ national parliaments, often in joint meetings on specific policies. In the course of the legislative process, representatives of EP committees meet frequently with their counterparts in the Council of Ministers and the European Commission, in so-called ‘trilogue’ negotiations.

To read the pdf version of this “At a glance” infographic click here

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

About EPRSauthor

European Parliamentary Research Service of the European Parliament. The EPRS offers the best available research and analytical support to Members of the European Parliament, their staff, parliamentary committees and, of course, to you!

Discussion

18 thoughts on “The European Parliament 2009-14 : Five years’ work in figures

  1. No Matter How You Slice It
    May 16, 2014 by Hannah Kaminsky 12 Comments
    Timing is everything when it comes to food reviews. Trends are as unpredictable as the weather, turning the latest and greatest innovations into old-hat just a month down the road. This unstoppable phenomenon has never been more clear to me as I flip through old files, discovering half-baked reviews from products first sampled almost a year ago (!) now. Where did the time go, and more …

    Like

    Posted by เย็ดหี | June 7, 2014, 20:36
  2. Wonderful but what has the Parliament done for the UK?

    Like

    Posted by evad666 | May 21, 2014, 21:34
  3. Reblogged this on Mediacodex.

    Like

    Posted by Wahyd Vannoni | May 20, 2014, 12:05
    • Innanzitutto il Servizio europeo di ricerca parlamentare European Parliamentary Research Service, è sponsorizzato dalla Commissione Ue, cioè prende fondi europei. Di conseguenza la ricerca tende a provare che il costo unitario per ogni cittadino europeo (3,5 euro) è inferiore al costo unitario che grava sui cittadini dei singoli paesi membri per mantenere i propri parlamenti come ad esempio la Germania che, sempre secondo la ricerca, spenderebbe 8,20 euro a cittadino per finanziare il parlamento. Inoltre, ma la cosa non sembra essere stata presa in considerazione, che il calcolo del costo medio unitario che grava sui cittadini, è stato fatto sulla totalità degli abitanti dell’Europa, che ovviamente sono molti di più in assoluto e quindi in percentuale, di quelli di ogni singolo paese!!!! Ecco perché la media viene sempre a favore del Parlamento europeo!!!

      Like

      Posted by Fabrizio de Jorio | April 27, 2014, 06:08
  4. Do you know how many EC proposals have been rejected by the EP?

    Like

    Posted by EPinNL | April 15, 2014, 17:35
    • This is not as straightforward as it seems. As you know, there are different ways, in which legislative proposals may be ‘rejected’, and, for instance lead to the European Commission withdrawing a legislative proposal. Thus, I suggest that you do a quick search yourself on Legislative Observatory: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/oeil/search/search.do?searchTab=y
      You can easily refine your search in the right column (select the EP term, procedure type, procedure status).

      Like

      Posted by EPRSAdmin | April 17, 2014, 09:31
      • Innanzitutto il Servizio europeo di ricerca parlamentare European Parliamentary Research Service, è sponsorizzato dalla Commissione Ue, cioè prende fondi europei. Di conseguenza la ricerca tende a provare che il costo unitario per ogni cittadino europeo (3,5 euro) è inferiore al costo unitario che grava sui cittadini dei singoli paesi membri per mantenere i propri parlamenti come ad esempio la Germania che, sempre secondo la ricerca, spenderebbe 8,20 euro a cittadino per finanziare il parlamento. Inoltre, ma la cosa non sembra essere stata presa in considerazione, che il calcolo del costo medio unitario che grava sui cittadini, è stato fatto sulla totalità degli abitanti dell’Europa, che ovviamente sono molti di più in assoluto e quindi in percentuale, di quelli di ogni singolo paese!!!! Ecco perché la media viene sempre a favore del Parlamento europeo!!! C’è poi la questione della doppia/tripla sede. Secondo alcune stime conservative elencate nel rapporto Fox-Hafner, i costi annuali della dispersione geografica dell’europarlamento sono compresi fra i 156 e i 204 milioni di euro, circa il 10% del bilancio annuale del PE. Nei 435 km che separano le due città si spostano circa 5.000 persone fra deputati, assistenti e personale amministrativo determinando uno spreco di denaro e un’emissione annuale di CO2 che supera le 19.000 tonnellate. Tutti i 766 deputati del PE e i 160 funzionari della Commissione hanno un ufficio sia a Bruxelles sia a Strasburgo. 150 funzionari hanno addirittura un terzo ufficio in Lussemburgo. Se a questo si aggiunge che la sede di Strasburgo viene utilizzata solo per 42 giorni, ma necessita tutto l’anno di manutenzione e riscaldamento, si ottiene uno spreco di denaro disarmante.

        Like

        Posted by Fabrizio de Jorio | April 27, 2014, 06:28

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: 2014: a great year in European politics? A great year on the EPRS Think Tank Blog | European Parliamentary Research Service - December 24, 2014

  2. Pingback: Tuhansia tunteja kokouksia - tältä näyttää Euroopan parlamentin viisivuotiskausi lukuina | Iltapuuro - August 31, 2014

  3. Pingback: 5 things we learned in April | European Parliamentary Research Service - August 11, 2014

  4. Pingback: Our first six months – EPRS Blog 2014 | European Parliamentary Research Service - July 18, 2014

  5. Pingback: #EP2014 #25maggio – Cosa ha fatto il Parlamento europeo durante l’ultima legislatura? « Time to act! - May 21, 2014

  6. Pingback: Et si l’Allemagne et la France s’entendaient pour sortir de l’euro ? Par Jean-Jacques Rosa « Le blog A Lupus un regard hagard sur Lécocomics et ses finances - May 14, 2014

  7. Pingback: The European Parliament 2009-14 : Five years’ work in figures via @EP_ThinkTank | Europarl2014 - April 30, 2014

  8. Pingback: “Graphs + Maps + Charts = Graphics Warehouse” — The Week | European Parliamentary Research Service - April 25, 2014

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

EU’s refugee crisis
EU Legislation in Progress
Topical Digests
EPRS Podcasts

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,881 other followers

Disclaimer and Copyright statement

The content of all documents (and articles) contained in this blog is the sole responsibility of the author and any opinions expressed therein do not necessarily represent the official position of the European Parliament. It is addressed to the Members and staff of the EP for their parliamentary work. Reproduction and translation for non-commercial purposes are authorised, provided the source is acknowledged and the European Parliament is given prior notice and sent a copy. Copyright © European Union, 2014. All rights reserved

%d bloggers like this: