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International Relations, PUBLICATIONS

US foreign policy after the 2020 Presidential election: Issues for the European Union

Written by Elena Lazarou and Jana Titievskaia with Cecilia Handeland,

© corund / Adobe Stock

The election of the 46th President of the United States took place on 3 November 2020 amidst the unprecedented scenario of the coronavirus pandemic. Following several days of vote-counting, the democratic candidate, Joe Biden, secured the electoral votes needed to become the next President of the United States. His inauguration will take place on 20 January 2021.

Domestic concerns, most notably the management of the coronavirus crisis and the economy, as well as racial issues, were the most important subjects in determining voter preference. As usual, foreign policy did not rank highly amidst voters’ concerns. However, for the European Union, the impact of the election of Joe Biden on US foreign policy will leave a substantial mark on the future course of transatlantic relations and of global cooperation.

While foreign policy under the forthcoming Biden Administration is expected to depart from some of the key tenets of President Trump’s ‘America First’ foreign policy, experts also point to a high possibility of continuity in areas such as trade and relations with China. However, on climate change, multilateral cooperation and support for NATO, expectations are high regarding a potential return to deep levels of transatlantic consensus and cooperation. Biden’s foreign policy is likely to focus on multilateral cooperation, for example by re-joining the Paris Agreement on climate change and resuming US support for the World Health Organization. The former Vice-President has stated he will likely re-join the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA, or Iran Nuclear Deal) in time, and pursue an extension of the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) with Russia.


Read the complete briefing on ‘US foreign policy after the 2020 Presidential election: Issues for the European Union‘ in the Think Tank pages of the European Parliament.

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