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EU legislation and policies to fight racial and ethnic discrimination [Policy Podcast]

Written by David de Groot,

© Yuliia / Adobe Stock

Racial and ethnic minorities face discrimination and its consequences on a daily basis. The exact scale of the problem is hard to gauge owing to a lack of data and general under-reporting of racist incidents. The pandemic has seen a major increase in reports of racist and xenophobic incidents, however, while racial and ethnic minority groups have been disproportionately affected by the crisis, with higher death and infection rates.

Although since 2000 the European Union (EU) has introduced legislation to combat racial and xenophobic discrimination, the problem persists, with the need for new measures recently highlighted by the global Black Lives Matter protests. A number of studies also point to the cost of racial discrimination not only for the individuals concerned but also for society as a whole. For instance, a 2018 EPRS report argued that the loss in earnings caused by racial and ethnic discrimination for both individuals and societies amounts to billions of euros annually. The problem is also acknowledged by EU citizens: a 2019 survey found that over half of Europeans believe racial or ethnic discrimination to be widespread in their country.

To address racial discrimination and its underlying inequalities, the European Commission has put forward a number of equality strategies and actions. The first European Summit against Racism was held on 19 March 2021. The European Parliament, meanwhile, has long been demanding an end to racial discrimination. In recent resolutions, Parliament has called for an end to structural racism and discrimination, racial profiling and police brutality, and for the right to protest peacefully.


Read the complete briefing on ‘EU legislation and policies to fight racial and ethnic discrimination‘ in the Think Tank pages of the European Parliament.

Listen to policy podcast ‘EU legislation and policies to fight racial and ethnic discrimination’ on YouTube.

Opinion on how widespread ethnic discrimination is in the Member State

Opinion on how widespread ethnic discrimination is in the Member State

Discussion

One thought on “EU legislation and policies to fight racial and ethnic discrimination [Policy Podcast]

  1. Interesting, I love the idea. I wonder if you are talking about a global world or the resilience, you mention, is restricted to EU borders.

    Like

    Posted by Rufina Espin | April 21, 2021, 18:20

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